Citation: The access of mobile phones by the police – Owen Bowcott, The Guardian

The Guardian has posted on Privacy International’s recent challenge to mobile phone interception by the police force.

The issue centers around the extraction of data from mobile phones by the force. Software is used to download the files stored on the accessed mobile devices. NGO Privacy International is challenging the invasiveness and proportionality of the practice in harvesting personal data in the course of investigations.

red smartphone on white surface

The outcome of the case will have significant repercussions for mobile data privacy and mobile developments. Mobile privacy has been a hot topic issue since the US Apple vs. FBI encryption case in relation to the investigation of the San Bernadino Shootings in 2016. We will have coverage of the case once judgment is handed down.

The privacy implications of using facial recognition software

The use of facial recognition software (“FRS”) in security and monitoring was thrust into the spotlight by the London Mayor Sadiq Khan, taking issue with a London developer over its installation in a King’s Cross site. In this post on the Privacy Perspective we consider the privacy and data protection issues with integrating FRS into security systems, an issue currently before the courts. Continue reading

Big brother is watching you, in compliance with the European Convention of Human Rights

Revisiting the case of Big Brother Watch and Others v. the United Kingdom

The operation of the UK’s surveillance services, MI5, MI6, GCHQ and the Metropolitan Police Service and their interaction with human rights (“Convention rights”) have historically been obscure to safeguard the interests of national security. The specifics of policy and practices when conducting national surveillance and its interaction with the private lives citizens have only come to light since the whistleblowing of Edward Snowden in 2013, catalyzing closer scrutiny of their potential to impinge upon the democratic freedoms.

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