Cricketer Ben Stokes and mother Deborah Stokes achieve settlement in privacy case against the Sun newspaper, securing rare unreserved apology

Following the publication of an article in 2019 in the Sun newspaper concerning a family matter before the cricketer was born, Ben Stokes and his mother have achieved a settlement from the Sun newspaper.

Mother of Ben Stokes, Deborah Stokes commented: “The decision to publish this article was a decision to expose, and to profit from exposing, intensely private and painful matters within our family. The suffering caused to our family by the publication of this article is something we cannot forgive.

“Ben and I can take no pleasure in concluding this settlement with the Sun. We can only hope that our actions in holding the paper to account will leave a lasting mark, and one that will contribute to prevent other families from having to suffer the same pain as was inflicted on our family by this article.”

The family were represented by Brabners LLP. Paul Lunt, solicitor to Ben and Deborah Stokes and Head of Litigation, said “The Sun has apologised to Ben and Deborah. The paper has accepted that the article ought never to have seen the light of day. The apology to our clients acknowledges the great distress caused to Ben, Deborah and their family by what was a gross intrusion – and exploitation – of their privacy. Substantial damages have also been paid, as well as payment of legal costs.”

See the Brabners LLP press release here.

The Sun stated: “On 17 September 2019 we published a story titled ‘Tragedy that Haunts Stokes’ Family’ which described a tragic incident that had occurred to Deborah Stokes, the mother of Ben Stokes, in New Zealand in 1988. The article caused great distress to the Stokes family, and especially to Deborah Stokes. We should not have published the article. We apologise to Deborah and Ben Stokes. We have agreed to pay them damages and their legal costs.”

Coverage of the settlement can be found in the Guardian, Press Gazette and BBC Sport, amongst others.

Mail on Sunday settle with Duke of Sussex, Prince Harry, over allegations regarding “distancing” from the British Armed Forces

A unilateral statement open court was presented before Justice Nicklin in the case bought by the Duke of Sussex against the Mail on Sunday.

The settlement concerns an article published on 25 October 2020 that alleged that the Prince had distanced himself from the British Army and the Royal Marines in particular ignoring correspondence from Lord Dannatt, a former Chief of the General Staff.

The Mail on Sunday and the MailOnline admitted the falisity of the statements.

The Statement recounted the Duke’s continuing efforts to engage with the British Armed Forces including the Royal Marines.

It highlighted that the article has remained published for 33 days, all the while disparaging the Duke’s relationship with the British Armed Forces.

A settlement offer was made to the Duke on 3rd December 2020 and accepted on 21st October 2020. Am apology to be placed in the Corrections and Clarifications columns was agreed.

As is typical with these statements attention was drawn to the fact that the intention was to settle the case and prevent further costly litigation. It was stated that the damage caused by the article in relation to these reparations was disproportionate.

The correction was published in the Mail on Sunday an area of the paper far smaller than the original article and in a right hand page which garners significantly more attention. There was no heading to the apology.

The MailOnline published a similar correction and clarification the garnered 9 shares compared to the 1,000 shares and 3,000 reader comments on the original article. The apology was also only published on the MailOline app for a period of 24 hours despite 64% of the readership having used the app to read articles, meaning a significantly less number of readers would have read the apology.

Importantly both Defendants were alleged to have used wording which significantly underplayed the seriousness of the complaint. Further they failed to acknowledge the statements were false meaning the Duke had to resort to a Statement in Open Court.

The Defendant had offered to donate the proceeds of the settlement to the Invictus Games Foundation. However, the apology did not state the Duke has decided to donate the settlement monies to the Invictus Games Foundation after receiving them himself so he could feel that some good had come of the case.

See coverage of the settlement on:

Inforrm

Sky

Independent

BBC